Lory Louves

Lory Louves

“Sound of the Sunset”

Please introduce yourself to the readers of Dull Magazine.
My name is Lory, I’m 29 and I’m an artist. I was born and raised in Paris and grew up in the northern suburb of Paris. I’ve lived in London for now 6 years.
Living in London, you’re back in France for “Sound of the Sunset,” the name of your 5th art exhibition and the second in Paris. How did it all come about?
Sound of the Sunset is the evolution of everything I’ve done so far. The concept is complex and not at the same time. There are a few references, one of them being synesthesia. This is the key in Sound of the Sunset, as we hear sounds but see the sunset.
I feel like what we hear and the visuals have a very intricate relationship. In my case, I can’t paint if I don’t listen to music, it’s part of my creative process. That’s what I wanted to show with this exhibition.
From the feedback you have had since the exhibition, what are the visitors’ favorite pieces?
I find the differences in what people like very interesting. A lot of people liked the one called “All the tides of the ocean.” “#Skyporn” was also a visitors’ favorite. I don’t think people actually realise why they are liking it.
Why do they, in your opinion?
The thought behind it was “Let’s have a picture that looks like somebody taking a picture of a sunset on his or her phone.” #Skyporn is relatable. The size of the piece is 1,50m on 1m. It’s like a phone screen, it looks like it’s the same format of a picture you’d take on your phone and share on Instagram Story.
#Skyporn is also a painting that I considered unfinished. I was meant to work more on it and decided not to at the very last minute. So, I love that people still gravitate to it, make their own story and picture their own landscape around it.
The previous Paris exhibition, “Self-Construct” (2015) was partly inspired by police brutality in the United States and in France towards minority communities. Did you consciously choose to go a different route for Sound of the Sunset?
“Self-Construct” was a social comment. I felt that was my duty as an artist to talk about those type of events and being a black male, I felt concerned. But it was fuelled by feelings, just like Sound of the Sunset.
I was angry, hurt and sad. These were my feelings of the moment and the paintings were a bit darker and busier. In “Sound of the Sunset,” I express my feelings even more and visitors get to know me a bit deeper.
Looking back at your past exhibitions, tell us how your painting style has changed over the years.
My technique, the colours I’m using are different. Certain pieces of Sound of the Sunset were a challenge to complete because It was new and different.
When I did my first solo exhibition, “Sangomas” in London, it was a specific painting style and I felt trapped in it. I also had a nickname that I was going by and it got to a point where it didn’t make sense anymore.
I had to change my style and it took me a good year or year and a half to figure out what I wanted to do and how I wanted to do it.
One thing that hasn’t changed is that I still paint for myself. This is my way of expressing myself and I’m doing it because I need to. These feelings have to be released.
Do you consider yourself “psychologically and emotionally unstable”?
I do! I feel like you have to, to be an artist. I have to have a lot of emotion to share some of it with people. I’d have mood swings and even when I paint, sometimes I love it, sometimes I hate it.
[Lory Louves]
Is it a strength?
I think it’s a strength. And there are degrees of emotional instability. There’s a condition called cyclothymia which is part of the spectrum of bipolarity. It only consists of mood swings, people going from happy to sad in one breath. There are also different degrees of being bipolar.
I see it as a strength, especially in this era of us only showing our best selves because of social media. People have thousands and thousands of followers and post thousands of pictures of them smiling, but you just can’t be happy like this. I truly wish they are, but a lot of things affect us and affect our lives as human beings. The question is “how do we deal with that?”
So, it’s important to share what we feel.
Music being one of your obsessions, what did you listen to in the making of “Sound of the Sunset”?
I did a playlist of 160 songs for the show which covers most of what I’ve listened to over the past six months, or the past year—most of the paintings were done in the last six months. One was done last year, and one is 2 years old.
I listened to a lot of jazz, so there’s a lot of that in this playlist, up to 60% of the songs. A lot of Frank Ocean as well, and songs that I wouldn’t listen to on the regular but that made me feel something, so they had to be part of it.
Does music inspire your paintings or vice versa?
I go on Spotify, browse and look for new stuff to listen to when I’m looking for inspiration. Music is part of my creative process, it actually starts my creative process, so I never really wondered if I paint what I listen to or listen to what I want to paint.
Music sets the mood, gets my brain straight to think about certain stuff. It is just part of the process, just like me putting my bowls of paint on the table and wearing my work clothes. I put music on because I need to and can’t paint without it.
Who are the artists you look up to?
There’s one guy that I look up to and that I’m inspired by, in so many ways. His name is Gerhard Richter, he’s a German painter.
I remember the first time I went to Tate and saw of his pieces, in a room full of his stuff, I remember how it made me feel. This was the first time I’ve felt that way and told myself “Okay, this is it! As an artist, that’s what I gotta do to make people feel something.” I don’t feel I’ll ever make people feel something that deep and that strong—or you never know—but that was a turning point.
That’s what inspired me to change my style, to express myself better and deeper.
Before the opening of “Sound of the Sunset”, what is the last exhibition you’ve visited?
I went to Tate Modern—living in London, I go to Tate most of my time—a few weeks back with my girlfriend to visit “PICASSO 1932 – LOVE, FAME, TRAGEDY.” It’s about following Picasso throughout a year. It’s interesting to see how the work evolves within that period and how he would express the same idea in different ways, for instance a lady sitting on a red chair. We’d have 5 or 6 different types of of that lady, some more abstract than others. That makes us think several artists are shown, when in reality this is the same guy.
I find it fascinating because we try to stick to one style, saying to ourselves “this is what I do” or should be doing. But we shouldn’t be or feel forced to stay on one thing.
Last word?
The exhibition closed on September, Sunday 9th and the unsold pieces are on sale on my website, lorylouves.com. This is also where you will find all the information about my previous shows and what I’ll do next. You can follow me on Instagram at @lorylouves.
There’s one person I’d like to thank, that’s my grandma. Sound of the Sunset wouldn’t have happened without her, her help and inspiration. She’s the strongest lady I’ve ever met and will ever meet. This show was for her.
Interview by Iggy Nko
Photos by Demarcus Allen

Lory Louves

“Sound of the Sunset”

Please introduce yourself to the readers of Dull Magazine.
My name is Lory, I’m 29 and I’m an artist. I was born and raised in Paris and grew up in the northern suburb of Paris. I’ve lived in London for now 6 years.
Living in London, you’re back in France for “Sound of the Sunset,” the name of your 5th art exhibition and the second in Paris. How did it all come about?
Sound of the Sunset is the evolution of everything I’ve done so far. The concept is complex and not at the same time. There are a few references, one of them being synesthesia. This is the key in Sound of the Sunset, as we hear sounds but see the sunset.
I feel like what we hear and the visuals have a very intricate relationship. In my case, I can’t paint if I don’t listen to music, it’s part of my creative process. That’s what I wanted to show with this exhibition.
From the feedback you have had since the exhibition, what are the visitors’ favorite pieces?
I find the differences in what people like very interesting. A lot of people liked the one called “All the tides of the ocean.” “#Skyporn” was also a visitors’ favorite. I don’t think people actually realise why they are liking it.
Why do they, in your opinion?
The thought behind it was “Let’s have a picture that looks like somebody taking a picture of a sunset on his or her phone.” #Skyporn is relatable. The size of the piece is 1,50m on 1m. It’s like a phone screen, it looks like it’s the same format of a picture you’d take on your phone and share on Instagram Story.
#Skyporn is also a painting that I considered unfinished. I was meant to work more on it and decided not to at the very last minute. So, I love that people still gravitate to it, make their own story and picture their own landscape around it.
The previous Paris exhibition, “Self-Construct” (2015) was partly inspired by police brutality in the United States and in France towards minority communities. Did you consciously choose to go a different route for Sound of the Sunset?
“Self-Construct” was a social comment. I felt that was my duty as an artist to talk about those type of events and being a black male, I felt concerned. But it was fuelled by feelings, just like Sound of the Sunset.
I was angry, hurt and sad. These were my feelings of the moment and the paintings were a bit darker and busier. In “Sound of the Sunset,” I express my feelings even more and visitors get to know me a bit deeper.
Looking back at your past exhibitions, tell us how your painting style has changed over the years.
My technique, the colours I’m using are different. Certain pieces of Sound of the Sunset were a challenge to complete because It was new and different.
When I did my first solo exhibition, “Sangomas” in London, it was a specific painting style and I felt trapped in it. I also had a nickname that I was going by and it got to a point where it didn’t make sense anymore.
I had to change my style and it took me a good year or year and a half to figure out what I wanted to do and how I wanted to do it.
One thing that hasn’t changed is that I still paint for myself. This is my way of expressing myself and I’m doing it because I need to. These feelings have to be released.
Do you consider yourself “psychologically and emotionally unstable”?
I do! I feel like you have to, to be an artist. I have to have a lot of emotion to share some of it with people. I’d have mood swings and even when I paint, sometimes I love it, sometimes I hate it.
[Lory Louves]
Is it a strength?
I think it’s a strength. And there are degrees of emotional instability. There’s a condition called cyclothymia which is part of the spectrum of bipolarity. It only consists of mood swings, people going from happy to sad in one breath. There are also different degrees of being bipolar.
I see it as a strength, especially in this era of us only showing our best selves because of social media. People have thousands and thousands of followers and post thousands of pictures of them smiling, but you just can’t be happy like this. I truly wish they are, but a lot of things affect us and affect our lives as human beings. The question is “how do we deal with that?”
So, it’s important to share what we feel.
Music being one of your obsessions, what did you listen to in the making of “Sound of the Sunset”?
I did a playlist of 160 songs for the show which covers most of what I’ve listened to over the past six months, or the past year—most of the paintings were done in the last six months. One was done last year, and one is 2 years old.
I listened to a lot of jazz, so there’s a lot of that in this playlist, up to 60% of the songs. A lot of Frank Ocean as well, and songs that I wouldn’t listen to on the regular but that made me feel something, so they had to be part of it.
Does music inspire your paintings or vice versa?
I go on Spotify, browse and look for new stuff to listen to when I’m looking for inspiration. Music is part of my creative process, it actually starts my creative process, so I never really wondered if I paint what I listen to or listen to what I want to paint.
Music sets the mood, gets my brain straight to think about certain stuff. It is just part of the process, just like me putting my bowls of paint on the table and wearing my work clothes. I put music on because I need to and can’t paint without it.
Who are the artists you look up to?
There’s one guy that I look up to and that I’m inspired by, in so many ways. His name is Gerhard Richter, he’s a German painter.
I remember the first time I went to Tate and saw of his pieces, in a room full of his stuff, I remember how it made me feel. This was the first time I’ve felt that way and told myself “Okay, this is it! As an artist, that’s what I gotta do to make people feel something.” I don’t feel I’ll ever make people feel something that deep and that strong—or you never know—but that was a turning point.
That’s what inspired me to change my style, to express myself better and deeper.
Before the opening of “Sound of the Sunset”, what is the last exhibition you’ve visited?
I went to Tate Modern—living in London, I go to Tate most of my time—a few weeks back with my girlfriend to visit “PICASSO 1932 – LOVE, FAME, TRAGEDY.” It’s about following Picasso throughout a year. It’s interesting to see how the work evolves within that period and how he would express the same idea in different ways, for instance a lady sitting on a red chair. We’d have 5 or 6 different types of of that lady, some more abstract than others. That makes us think several artists are shown, when in reality this is the same guy.
I find it fascinating because we try to stick to one style, saying to ourselves “this is what I do” or should be doing. But we shouldn’t be or feel forced to stay on one thing.
Last word?
The exhibition closed on September, Sunday 9th and the unsold pieces are on sale on my website, lorylouves.com. This is also where you will find all the information about my previous shows and what I’ll do next. You can follow me on Instagram at @lorylouves.
There’s one person I’d like to thank, that’s my grandma. Sound of the Sunset wouldn’t have happened without her, her help and inspiration. She’s the strongest lady I’ve ever met and will ever meet. This show was for her.
Interview by Iggy Nko
Photos by Demarcus Allen