Lala &ce

Lala &ce

Were you always destined to be a rapper?
I can’t remember ever not loving rap. And not just the whole hip hop culture of dance, rap, DJing and even graffitiing, but also more specifically what you do with words and how you can make people feel. I was always fascinated when I heard those guys play games with language, whether they were using an old-fashioned or modern vocabulary. Figuring out how lyrics are written is like doing a puzzle. But as well as the words, there is also the rhythm, the flow, and even sometimes a melody. There is also a real authenticity in the message communicated by rap. Its origins are rooted in the real.
It has always been a part of my life. Even in my earliest memories, I remember listening to it or hearing it at home, in the street, at school, and on TV. There was also music everywhere in general – Tupac in by brothers’ room, Usher in my sister’s room, zouglou in the living room, and Georges Brassens in my dad’s office.
It might sound strange, but I’ve always felt rap within me. Even before I started writing, I knew I was going to end up making tracks. It was just a question of starting at the right time, when I wanted to, and I when I was ready.
Are you bothered by the fact female rappers struggle to make it in the industry?
I feel like that’s a naive question. It’s actually simple – the rap game is just a reflection of society. It’s the same thing when it comes to the number of female rappers. Are there lots of women in rock? No. What about powerful female politicians? There are certainly more men higher up.
It’s a mirror-image of society. And these women in rap make it in the same way as in every other profession, by fighting and working hard.
I don’t make any distinctions. I’ll take down a man or a woman when it comes to rapping. I don’t have a problem with that.
Why did you decide to live in London?
The city is perfectly suited to me, and I’ve fallen in love with it!
[Lala &ce]
Can you tell us a bit about your next album set to be released in September 2018?
It’s going to be introduced by a mixtape that will be coming out in a few months. It will mark a change of direction in my music, something more solid than anything I’ve released before. There will be bits of music from different genres, but all intelligently linked together.
Do you still think rap gives a voice to the underprivileged youth?
Yeah, it’s still there. We shouldn’t forget the original message of rap and hip hop, shouted out by oppressed black people in New York. I think that’s crucial. Nowadays everyone can shout their truth, but it doesn’t matter if you’re talking about your home or your baby girl, it just has to be real. You can’t make up your life, there’s no point in that.
What do think of the new wave of French rap?
I don’t know everything about it, but I know there is some good stuff and some awful stuff. My people are still killing it, though. I can see it growing in my home town of Lyon as well, and that makes me proud.
Look 1: Manon : beret Gosha Rubchinskiy, jacket Studio Pierre, turtleneck stylist's own
Lala : coat + jeans Neith Nyer, sunglasses Koché

Look 2: shirt + pants Studio Pierre, turtleneck Koché

Look 3
Manon: bra Neith Nyer, jogging Faith Connection X Kappa Lala : leather cropped jacket Courrèges, jeans Neith Nyer

Photo Julot Bandit
Stylist Metus Pm
Make Up Maria Bonita
Model Manon Raxach @ Oui Management

Lala &ce

Were you always destined to be a rapper?
I can’t remember ever not loving rap. And not just the whole hip hop culture of dance, rap, DJing and even graffitiing, but also more specifically what you do with words and how you can make people feel. I was always fascinated when I heard those guys play games with language, whether they were using an old-fashioned or modern vocabulary. Figuring out how lyrics are written is like doing a puzzle. But as well as the words, there is also the rhythm, the flow, and even sometimes a melody. There is also a real authenticity in the message communicated by rap. Its origins are rooted in the real.
It has always been a part of my life. Even in my earliest memories, I remember listening to it or hearing it at home, in the street, at school, and on TV. There was also music everywhere in general – Tupac in by brothers’ room, Usher in my sister’s room, zouglou in the living room, and Georges Brassens in my dad’s office.
It might sound strange, but I’ve always felt rap within me. Even before I started writing, I knew I was going to end up making tracks. It was just a question of starting at the right time, when I wanted to, and I when I was ready.
Are you bothered by the fact female rappers struggle to make it in the industry?
I feel like that’s a naive question. It’s actually simple – the rap game is just a reflection of society. It’s the same thing when it comes to the number of female rappers. Are there lots of women in rock? No. What about powerful female politicians? There are certainly more men higher up.
It’s a mirror-image of society. And these women in rap make it in the same way as in every other profession, by fighting and working hard.
I don’t make any distinctions. I’ll take down a man or a woman when it comes to rapping. I don’t have a problem with that.
Why did you decide to live in London?
The city is perfectly suited to me, and I’ve fallen in love with it!
[Lala &ce]
Can you tell us a bit about your next album set to be released in September 2018?
It’s going to be introduced by a mixtape that will be coming out in a few months. It will mark a change of direction in my music, something more solid than anything I’ve released before. There will be bits of music from different genres, but all intelligently linked together.
Do you still think rap gives a voice to the underprivileged youth?
Yeah, it’s still there. We shouldn’t forget the original message of rap and hip hop, shouted out by oppressed black people in New York. I think that’s crucial. Nowadays everyone can shout their truth, but it doesn’t matter if you’re talking about your home or your baby girl, it just has to be real. You can’t make up your life, there’s no point in that.
What do think of the new wave of French rap?
I don’t know everything about it, but I know there is some good stuff and some awful stuff. My people are still killing it, though. I can see it growing in my home town of Lyon as well, and that makes me proud.
Look 1: Manon : beret Gosha Rubchinskiy, jacket Studio Pierre, turtleneck stylist's own
Lala : coat + jeans Neith Nyer, sunglasses Koché

Look 2: shirt + pants Studio Pierre, turtleneck Koché

Look 3
Manon: bra Neith Nyer, jogging Faith Connection X Kappa Lala : leather cropped jacket Courrèges, jeans Neith Nyer

Photo Julot Bandit
Stylist Metus Pm
Make Up Maria Bonita
Model Manon Raxach @ Oui Management