Luka Sabbat

Luka Sabbat

Hotmess

Tell us about “Hotmess”. What’s the aim of the project? How did it come about? How did you meet your collaborators, photographer Noah Dillon and writer/journalist Curtis Eggleston?
I was a fan of Noah’s work and checked him out on twitter and that’s how we met. I wanted to start a project with him so I dm’d him and asked to meet me in LA and that’s how it started. Curtis came in later, Noah brought him in after we took all the HOTMESS images. He wrote captions for them. He was inspired by the images and wrote content for them. The aim of the project is for it to be used as a new creative voice for today’s generation by their like contemporaries.
Following a 3-day exhibition, a “Merch” capsule collection saw the light of day. As a model/stylist/influencer renowned for your style, was it somehow difficult to actually design a clothing line?
No it wasn’t difficult to design the clothing line. It’s a reflection of a part of my style, basically they are styles that I would wear.
The “Hotmess” art show occurred at Milk Gallery in New York City, in February. How did it unfold?
Hotmess took place at Milk. My father reached out to some of his business relationships who saw the potential in our work and were willing to give us a chance to show the world what we can do.
Fans of yours, celebrity friends and industry influencers showed up to what you called your “first show”. Did you feel supported by your city of birth, peers and entourage?
People were very supportive and excited. They were those who believed in me but also pushed me to work harder and never slowed me down.
Talking about entourage, you’re part of a crew of influential fashion figures such as Heron Preston, Kanye West, Tyler, The Creator and Virgil Abloh. How’s the dynamic between you all? Is every project a team effort where you all get to chime in and make suggestions? Did they have a word or an advice in the making of the Hotmess exhibition and “merch” collection?
My friendships with my friends/crew and my creativity are separate. No one saw HOTMESS until it actually came out.
"My friendships with my friends/crew and my creativity are separate. No one saw HOTMESS until it actually came out." [Luka Sabbat]
Would you consider hosting a similar event in another city, like in Paris where you also grew up?
Yes we’re in the process of trying to organize a HOTMESS in Paris, London and Japan too.
The “Hotmess” NYFW exhibition and party was highly-anticipated. How do you feel about New York Fashion Week in general, and the excitement it brings to NYC?
New York Fashion Week brings a lot of the international community together. A lot of people attend that I don’t see everyday. It’s a great place to give designers a place to showcase their work and get recognized.
Beside New York, you became a regular at Paris and Milan Fashion Week. How are these gatherings different from one another, and what do you appreciate in each city that you don’t get somewhere else?
Culturally speaking, each city is different so obviously there are differences in the language, clothing, etc. The approach is different in each city, everyone has different views and having those different views helps keep the inspiration flowing.
Fashion has always been in awe of the youth. Being young, you’re making the most of it. What’s the plan to establish yourself long term in this industry?
The plan is to keep doing quality work, keep pushing myself to do different projects according to the way I’m inspired to do. Creative quality and consistent work to do a beautiful job.
“Hotmess” is one of your many projects. What are currently working on that will come to life soon?
We’re working on more HOTMESS events, new collections of designs for my collab jewelry line LUKA X MONINI, and a possible underwear collaboration with Related Apparel where we will be giving a percentage of the profits to charities in Haiti.
By Iggy NKo

Photographer : Cian Moore, Luka Sabbat
Stylist : Luka Sabbat
Model: Adriana Mora
Portrait : @Lukasabbat

Luka Sabbat

Hotmess

Tell us about “Hotmess”. What’s the aim of the project? How did it come about? How did you meet your collaborators, photographer Noah Dillon and writer/journalist Curtis Eggleston?
I was a fan of Noah’s work and checked him out on twitter and that’s how we met. I wanted to start a project with him so I dm’d him and asked to meet me in LA and that’s how it started. Curtis came in later, Noah brought him in after we took all the HOTMESS images. He wrote captions for them. He was inspired by the images and wrote content for them. The aim of the project is for it to be used as a new creative voice for today’s generation by their like contemporaries.
Following a 3-day exhibition, a “Merch” capsule collection saw the light of day. As a model/stylist/influencer renowned for your style, was it somehow difficult to actually design a clothing line?
No it wasn’t difficult to design the clothing line. It’s a reflection of a part of my style, basically they are styles that I would wear.
The “Hotmess” art show occurred at Milk Gallery in New York City, in February. How did it unfold?
Hotmess took place at Milk. My father reached out to some of his business relationships who saw the potential in our work and were willing to give us a chance to show the world what we can do.
Fans of yours, celebrity friends and industry influencers showed up to what you called your “first show”. Did you feel supported by your city of birth, peers and entourage?
People were very supportive and excited. They were those who believed in me but also pushed me to work harder and never slowed me down.
Talking about entourage, you’re part of a crew of influential fashion figures such as Heron Preston, Kanye West, Tyler, The Creator and Virgil Abloh. How’s the dynamic between you all? Is every project a team effort where you all get to chime in and make suggestions? Did they have a word or an advice in the making of the Hotmess exhibition and “merch” collection?
My friendships with my friends/crew and my creativity are separate. No one saw HOTMESS until it actually came out.
"My friendships with my friends/crew and my creativity are separate. No one saw HOTMESS until it actually came out." [Luka Sabbat]
Would you consider hosting a similar event in another city, like in Paris where you also grew up?
Yes we’re in the process of trying to organize a HOTMESS in Paris, London and Japan too.
The “Hotmess” NYFW exhibition and party was highly-anticipated. How do you feel about New York Fashion Week in general, and the excitement it brings to NYC?
New York Fashion Week brings a lot of the international community together. A lot of people attend that I don’t see everyday. It’s a great place to give designers a place to showcase their work and get recognized.
Beside New York, you became a regular at Paris and Milan Fashion Week. How are these gatherings different from one another, and what do you appreciate in each city that you don’t get somewhere else?
Culturally speaking, each city is different so obviously there are differences in the language, clothing, etc. The approach is different in each city, everyone has different views and having those different views helps keep the inspiration flowing.
Fashion has always been in awe of the youth. Being young, you’re making the most of it. What’s the plan to establish yourself long term in this industry?
The plan is to keep doing quality work, keep pushing myself to do different projects according to the way I’m inspired to do. Creative quality and consistent work to do a beautiful job.
“Hotmess” is one of your many projects. What are currently working on that will come to life soon?
We’re working on more HOTMESS events, new collections of designs for my collab jewelry line LUKA X MONINI, and a possible underwear collaboration with Related Apparel where we will be giving a percentage of the profits to charities in Haiti.
By Iggy NKo

Photographer : Cian Moore, Luka Sabbat
Stylist : Luka Sabbat
Model: Adriana Mora
Portrait : @Lukasabbat