Luchino Gatti

Luchino Gatti

Please introduce yourself to the readers of Dull Magazine.
My name is Luchino, I’m 27 and I do movies. I was a boxer before I got into cinema. I just completed “PE$O,” a independently-produced, medium-length film.
We had a big premiere at Club Paris 19 par UGC in Paris, France with 400 people in attendance.
Can you tell us about your boxing career?
I started boxing at 10 and stopped at 24, 25. I competed in every regional championships and won my first national title, France junior champion, in 2009.
Then, I joined the French national team, traveled and fought in Germany, Poland for the European championships, Russia and Siberia. I became France senior vice-champion in 2010.
What do you keep from that experience?
I keep everything! It shaped me and made me who I am today, a hard-working, determined guy. I don’t overthink things, I just go for it.
When did you discover your passion for cinema?
I don’t know if “discover” is the right word. I always loved cinema and watched a lot of movies. I even shot some with my classmates, when I was younger. We did a remake of “The Godfather” in junior high school. My little brother Fabio was involved. Cinema has always been somewhere, but the passion definitely confirmed itself after “D I R T,” the very first short film I co-directed with Aswed Wahren, in 2014.
When did you know you wanted to become a movie director?
Right after “D I R T.” The making of it was an adventure. Aswed and I were in tune with each other. We spent endless nights writing and re-writing. On set, we didn’t have much. It was just was just the two of us, our cameras and my little brother Fabio acting.
I was telling myself It’d be so cool to do that.
“PE$O” is the title of your latest film. What is it about?
PE$O tells the story of Fabio, a convicted man who spent 5 years in prison for armed robbery. Fabio just got out and reunites with his girlfriend and their daughter.
While he was detained, Fabio’s best friend was waiting for him planning the robbery of a go-fast car. Fabio will have to complete another crime in order to leave his old life behind him and start a new one with his family.
What difficulties have you encountered in the making of PE$O?
So many! Pre-production was the worst. We scouted spots to shoot at and had to get permissions to actually shoot. We shot scenes in a butcher’s, at the Rungis International Market. We shot an armed robbery at night with real gunshots—the actors fired blanks. For that one alone, we needed an authorization from the City Hall. Overall, pre-production was a struggle.
Post-production was challenging as well and is hard to complete when you don’t have a team to help you. I had to go to Nice, in the south of France, to finish the movie. I was at the post office everyday, sending hard drives to Toulouse, Grenoble or somewhere.
Making a indie movie is just very hard.
How hard is being a 100% independent filmmaker?
It’s like climbing a mountain by yourself when you’ve never been a mountaineer. To make it short, you have to manage everything by yourself. You carry a heavy weight.
PE$O was a 20-page script. We shot 32 minutes, without the help or even recognition of any public or private organisations. It’s huge for an indie film.
In post-production, I was taking care of the shipping of hard drives, while working in the daytime. At the end of my shifts, I was visiting my sound engineer to give him directions. I had to promote the movie on social media and plan the premiere.
I became the head of my company, on duty 24/7. I was starting my days by looking at my schedule, filled with what I had to do. Then go to the post office, the bank… At a certain point, there was nothing creative to think about anymore.
The good thing—and one of the reasons we do it—is that we are totally free. We can do and say what we want. Nobody will stand against us and forbid us to do anything.
"The good thing—and one of the reasons we do it—is that we are totally free. We can do and say what we want. Nobody will stand against us and forbid us to do anything" [Luchino Gatti]
At the PE$O premiere, you told the attendance you invested a lot in the making of the film. What are your expectations for it?
PE$O is a bomb that is about to explode and I’m waiting for that.
I’ve got some very positive feedbacks so far. I know what I did and I know people like it. If this doesn’t blow up, I honestly don’t know what I’d have to do to break through. I’ve put everything in it.
PE$O has to explode and money has to come in, period.
What could you do with financial support and bigger budgets?
We had a quotation for PE$O. If we rented the equipment to shoot and paid the actors and technicians working on set, the film would have costed €150,000 to €200,000. We made it with €10,000.
In the process, I managed things a director usually doesn’t. With backing, we could be more focused on the art side of things. We could also be more accurate, we could express ourselves more easily and say more. I can say more in a hour and a half than in 30 minutes and we have the material to shoot a full-length movie.
Your last 3 pieces, “Bois d’Argent,” “Deadboy” and “PE$O” tell stories of crime in rough areas. Have you find your lane?
I wouldn’t call it my lane, I simply tell stories I like and know about.
There’s also a lot of feelings involved. In PE$O for instance, Fabio gets back to his family after years in prison. He is literally and figuratively looking for a heart.
Would you try another genre, one day?
I can’t tell you if or when I’ll try another cinema genre. I’m moving forward step by step, without really projecting in the future. I have skills I need to work on and everything will go as planned.
One thing I know is that I’ll live other experiences, I’ll travel and that will inspire me to tell other stories. I already have so many ideas on different matters. For example, I could shoot an entire film about Italy or happening in Italy. I went there all my life and I know people who live there.
Everything stars with my feelings and I have the feelings of somebody living in a Paris suburb. So It’s easy for me to tell stories happening here and around me.
Are there any filmmakers you look up to?
Amir Amor and Aswed Wahren are my favorites. They are two very-talented filmmakers I would love to see more of. They are my brothers, my role models and they inspire me a lot.
When I was younger, my father made me watch “Goodfellas” by Martin Scorsese. It definitely stuck with me. I admire Michael Cimino who’s had an incredible career. I also love Sergio Leone’s western movies.
These are all kind of violent movies with crime involved. They are all either directed by Italian directors or tell stories of Italian characters. Not sure if it has something to do with the fact that I like them.
What are your favorite movies?
“Heaven’s Gate,” the 4-hour movie by Michael Cimino and also one of the biggest money-losing movies ever released. Back in 1980, Cimino got trashed by critics. When he died, Heaven’s Gate became one of the most important films in the history of American cinema. He inspired me a lot.
I love “The Deer Hunter,” also directed by Cimino. “The Godfather,” “Scarface,” “Goodfellas” and Nicolas Winding-Refn’s “Pusher” are some of my absolute favorites.
I liked “The Foxcatcher,” that recently came out. I relate to the story of the wrestler.
What’s next for Luchino Gatti and your collective, Offwall1990? Are you working on or thinking about future projects?
Real is next! Real things that people will love.
As far as movies, we already have scripts written, including one for a full-length movie. But we’re waiting for backing.
We will release stuff prior to that. We might shoot music videos for the 667 rap collective, fashion videos, maybe work on something for Applecore. Look out for all that.
Any last words?
Big thanks to you, Iggy and to Dull. Major shout-outs to 667, to Applecore. Everybody in Soisy that show love and support us. We will not let you down. We will do what we have to do for this bomb to explode. It’s about to blow the fuck up!
Interview by @iggynko
For more, follow @luchinogatti on Instagram and Offwall1990 on Facebook

Luchino Gatti

Please introduce yourself to the readers of Dull Magazine.
My name is Luchino, I’m 27 and I do movies. I was a boxer before I got into cinema. I just completed “PE$O,” a independently-produced, medium-length film.
We had a big premiere at Club Paris 19 par UGC in Paris, France with 400 people in attendance.
Can you tell us about your boxing career?
I started boxing at 10 and stopped at 24, 25. I competed in every regional championships and won my first national title, France junior champion, in 2009.
Then, I joined the French national team, traveled and fought in Germany, Poland for the European championships, Russia and Siberia. I became France senior vice-champion in 2010.
What do you keep from that experience?
I keep everything! It shaped me and made me who I am today, a hard-working, determined guy. I don’t overthink things, I just go for it.
When did you discover your passion for cinema?
I don’t know if “discover” is the right word. I always loved cinema and watched a lot of movies. I even shot some with my classmates, when I was younger. We did a remake of “The Godfather” in junior high school. My little brother Fabio was involved. Cinema has always been somewhere, but the passion definitely confirmed itself after “D I R T,” the very first short film I co-directed with Aswed Wahren, in 2014.
When did you know you wanted to become a movie director?
Right after “D I R T.” The making of it was an adventure. Aswed and I were in tune with each other. We spent endless nights writing and re-writing. On set, we didn’t have much. It was just was just the two of us, our cameras and my little brother Fabio acting.
I was telling myself It’d be so cool to do that.
“PE$O” is the title of your latest film. What is it about?
PE$O tells the story of Fabio, a convicted man who spent 5 years in prison for armed robbery. Fabio just got out and reunites with his girlfriend and their daughter.
While he was detained, Fabio’s best friend was waiting for him planning the robbery of a go-fast car. Fabio will have to complete another crime in order to leave his old life behind him and start a new one with his family.
What difficulties have you encountered in the making of PE$O?
So many! Pre-production was the worst. We scouted spots to shoot at and had to get permissions to actually shoot. We shot scenes in a butcher’s, at the Rungis International Market. We shot an armed robbery at night with real gunshots—the actors fired blanks. For that one alone, we needed an authorization from the City Hall. Overall, pre-production was a struggle.
Post-production was challenging as well and is hard to complete when you don’t have a team to help you. I had to go to Nice, in the south of France, to finish the movie. I was at the post office everyday, sending hard drives to Toulouse, Grenoble or somewhere.
Making a indie movie is just very hard.
How hard is being a 100% independent filmmaker?
It’s like climbing a mountain by yourself when you’ve never been a mountaineer. To make it short, you have to manage everything by yourself. You carry a heavy weight.
PE$O was a 20-page script. We shot 32 minutes, without the help or even recognition of any public or private organisations. It’s huge for an indie film.
In post-production, I was taking care of the shipping of hard drives, while working in the daytime. At the end of my shifts, I was visiting my sound engineer to give him directions. I had to promote the movie on social media and plan the premiere.
I became the head of my company, on duty 24/7. I was starting my days by looking at my schedule, filled with what I had to do. Then go to the post office, the bank… At a certain point, there was nothing creative to think about anymore.
The good thing—and one of the reasons we do it—is that we are totally free. We can do and say what we want. Nobody will stand against us and forbid us to do anything.
"The good thing—and one of the reasons we do it—is that we are totally free. We can do and say what we want. Nobody will stand against us and forbid us to do anything" [Luchino Gatti]
At the PE$O premiere, you told the attendance you invested a lot in the making of the film. What are your expectations for it?
PE$O is a bomb that is about to explode and I’m waiting for that.
I’ve got some very positive feedbacks so far. I know what I did and I know people like it. If this doesn’t blow up, I honestly don’t know what I’d have to do to break through. I’ve put everything in it.
PE$O has to explode and money has to come in, period.
What could you do with financial support and bigger budgets?
We had a quotation for PE$O. If we rented the equipment to shoot and paid the actors and technicians working on set, the film would have costed €150,000 to €200,000. We made it with €10,000.
In the process, I managed things a director usually doesn’t. With backing, we could be more focused on the art side of things. We could also be more accurate, we could express ourselves more easily and say more. I can say more in a hour and a half than in 30 minutes and we have the material to shoot a full-length movie.
Your last 3 pieces, “Bois d’Argent,” “Deadboy” and “PE$O” tell stories of crime in rough areas. Have you find your lane?
I wouldn’t call it my lane, I simply tell stories I like and know about.
There’s also a lot of feelings involved. In PE$O for instance, Fabio gets back to his family after years in prison. He is literally and figuratively looking for a heart.
Would you try another genre, one day?
I can’t tell you if or when I’ll try another cinema genre. I’m moving forward step by step, without really projecting in the future. I have skills I need to work on and everything will go as planned.
One thing I know is that I’ll live other experiences, I’ll travel and that will inspire me to tell other stories. I already have so many ideas on different matters. For example, I could shoot an entire film about Italy or happening in Italy. I went there all my life and I know people who live there.
Everything stars with my feelings and I have the feelings of somebody living in a Paris suburb. So It’s easy for me to tell stories happening here and around me.
Are there any filmmakers you look up to?
Amir Amor and Aswed Wahren are my favorites. They are two very-talented filmmakers I would love to see more of. They are my brothers, my role models and they inspire me a lot.
When I was younger, my father made me watch “Goodfellas” by Martin Scorsese. It definitely stuck with me. I admire Michael Cimino who’s had an incredible career. I also love Sergio Leone’s western movies.
These are all kind of violent movies with crime involved. They are all either directed by Italian directors or tell stories of Italian characters. Not sure if it has something to do with the fact that I like them.
What are your favorite movies?
“Heaven’s Gate,” the 4-hour movie by Michael Cimino and also one of the biggest money-losing movies ever released. Back in 1980, Cimino got trashed by critics. When he died, Heaven’s Gate became one of the most important films in the history of American cinema. He inspired me a lot.
I love “The Deer Hunter,” also directed by Cimino. “The Godfather,” “Scarface,” “Goodfellas” and Nicolas Winding-Refn’s “Pusher” are some of my absolute favorites.
I liked “The Foxcatcher,” that recently came out. I relate to the story of the wrestler.
What’s next for Luchino Gatti and your collective, Offwall1990? Are you working on or thinking about future projects?
Real is next! Real things that people will love.
As far as movies, we already have scripts written, including one for a full-length movie. But we’re waiting for backing.
We will release stuff prior to that. We might shoot music videos for the 667 rap collective, fashion videos, maybe work on something for Applecore. Look out for all that.
Any last words?
Big thanks to you, Iggy and to Dull. Major shout-outs to 667, to Applecore. Everybody in Soisy that show love and support us. We will not let you down. We will do what we have to do for this bomb to explode. It’s about to blow the fuck up!
Interview by @iggynko
For more, follow @luchinogatti on Instagram and Offwall1990 on Facebook