Kate Bones

Kate Bones

Gif Queen

First, Kate, tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you, where are you from, and how would you describe what you do?
Hi. I am 30. I was born and raised in London, and I still live here! I would describe myself as a GIF maker, photographer and soon to be music video maker.
How did you start? Did you study photography or turned a hobby into a career?
I studied fine art sculpture and specialised in film and video. After graduating, I saved up and bought a DSLR kit with the intention of making more art films, starting with a music video for my friends’ group We Have Band, that never happened. I then started to learn how to take photographs with it and I fell in love with photography! I bought a small point-and-shoot camera I could carry it around with me and haven’t stopped shooting ever since. I take it to gigs and on nights out.
As written on your website, you "occasionally" work on films. Why the choice of photography -and GIFs- over film-making?
At around the same time that I bought my DSLR, I discovered Tumblr and all the amazing GIFs on there! The GIFs with a stereoscopic, 3D effect really jumped out at me, so I began to make them.
My first break came when my best friend’s band Maxixe were invited to play at the ‘In The Woods’ music festival and he suggested I come along and take pictures. I went into the pit with my little camera plus a lo-fi set-up of two disposable cameras taped together to shoot my first stereoscopic gifs. I got a few funny looks from some of the other photographers! The resulting GIFs and photographs were met with a lot of enthusiasm and the festival invited me back the following year to shoot a GIF portrait series of the line-up.
GIFs are a great medium as they’re a perfect bridge between the world of photography and film-making. Even though there’s been an explosion of GIF making apps released it’s definitely a skill and there’s only a handful of creatives who’ve mastered the art of the GIF.
You are also a strong film-over-digital advocate. Can you explain, with your experience and photographer point of view, the difference between the two?
Digital is great, but I can’t help feeling that anyone can take a great photo with the same DSLR camera and lens. The individual creative force and identity get lost. I feel lazier when i have a digital camera whereas I’m far more considered with film. When you start shooting on film you realise there’s nothing quite like it; the colour, the warmth and the texture are captivating. You’ve become creative whether you intended to or not!
Film is a bit like a fingerprint. The moment the shutter button is pressed creates something completely unique. The resulting photograph is dependant on so many factors. The temperature, film type, the light, the lens, your mood and even your breathing. It’s almost impossible to replicate that moment. That's really exciting. That’s what makes it an art form. And that’s what drew me in.
You shoot more music-related events than anything fashion. Are you more music than fashion in your personal life as well?
I have a lot of friends who are musicians and I love music so I was naturally drawn towards documenting these kinds of events. It’s also been a great way to hone my craft as well as experiment.
"The ideal situation for me and most artists is to be able to balance commercial work with creative projects. An artist has always had to adapt to survive and it's becoming harder than ever!" [Kate Bones]
Your Liam Hodges GIFs, shot backstage the brand’s Autumn-Winter 2016 fashion show in London, caught a lot of attention! Do you plan on extending your experience in fashion, by linking up with another clothing brand or fashion magazine?
I've actually worked with Liam since the London Collections Men shoot and hopefully we'll work on some more projects together. Prior to this, I made some GIFs with Clio Peppiatt which were really fun and very different to my previous work. I have also shot street style for ASOS and I am currently editing a GIF series I shot for Hunger Magazine this week, directed by the lovely Elizabeth Jane Bishop. So, yes, I’d love to work with other fashion brands and designers!
When did brands start to express interest in your work? How did they approach you?
It first started in September last year with a Red Bull commission to create a GIF portrait series of 24 creatives aged under 24 years old. They’d seen the artist GIF portraits I had shot for Simple Things festival. Shortly after, Converse commissioned me to make a series of GIFs for their ‘Made by You’ campaign.
Ever since then I’ve been really busy. I’ve just finished a GIF for the Grammys to represent Ed Sheeran’s song ‘Thinking out Loud’. I love challenges and trying new things.
Do you see yourself being more than a one-time collaborator, i.e. being employed full or part-time as a creative consultant for a brand, an organization or an agency?
I have no preconceptions about what I might do in the future. If it’s an interesting project, I’ll take it on.
As such, would you feel like you gave up your freedom as an artist? Or do you think you’d be able to keep it regardless?
The ideal situation for me and most artists is to be able to balance commercial work with creative projects. An artist has always had to adapt to survive and it's becoming harder than ever! At first I was a little apprehensive about working with big brands but it's been an eye opening experience.
When a brand is into what you do and they can see your potential, the platform they give you to create can be incredibly important to your personal development. My first big project with Red Bull was exciting and challenging. The team were incredibly supportive and enthusiastic about my GIF portrait work and the commission was for a big series so it was new territory for all of us. Thankfully It was well received and I've continued to work with them on other projects since.
Subsequently I believe I can be as creative working with brands as I can be with my own work. I'm genuinely looking forward to what I'll make in 2016, whether it's another a portraits series for a personal project or a set of rotoscoped animations for a big brand.
What would your dream project be?
I love musicians like PJ Harvey and Bjork who collaborate intensively on all aspects with one or more visual artists to create a whole package for an album. Video, artwork, photography, clothes etc. This creative process makes a lot of sense to me. It elevates the project to a higher level which is incredibly rewarding for everyone involved, fans included. It puts the musician back in control of their work and out of the hands of corporate labels and pushy management who follow a prescribed set of rules.
Fortunately the rise of social media has enabled artists and musicians to independently publish their work with minimal financial cost plus network and collaborate with ease.
There's never been a better time to be creative and inspired.
What’s next for Kate Bones? Should we look out for new videos? More collaborations? An exhibition?
I’d love to have a GIF exhibition! That would be very cool. It’s something I’ve thought about. The next big thing is a couple of music videos. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a while and a couple of the right songs by the right artists have just come along. There will also be more GIF-making. I’ll never stop GIF-ing! I’m Queen La GIF-AH!
By Iggy Nko, from issue #3
www.katebones.com
Photo by Jennifer Lo

Kate Bones

Gif Queen

First, Kate, tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you, where are you from, and how would you describe what you do?
Hi. I am 30. I was born and raised in London, and I still live here! I would describe myself as a GIF maker, photographer and soon to be music video maker.
How did you start? Did you study photography or turned a hobby into a career?
I studied fine art sculpture and specialised in film and video. After graduating, I saved up and bought a DSLR kit with the intention of making more art films, starting with a music video for my friends’ group We Have Band, that never happened. I then started to learn how to take photographs with it and I fell in love with photography! I bought a small point-and-shoot camera I could carry it around with me and haven’t stopped shooting ever since. I take it to gigs and on nights out.
As written on your website, you "occasionally" work on films. Why the choice of photography -and GIFs- over film-making?
At around the same time that I bought my DSLR, I discovered Tumblr and all the amazing GIFs on there! The GIFs with a stereoscopic, 3D effect really jumped out at me, so I began to make them.
My first break came when my best friend’s band Maxixe were invited to play at the ‘In The Woods’ music festival and he suggested I come along and take pictures. I went into the pit with my little camera plus a lo-fi set-up of two disposable cameras taped together to shoot my first stereoscopic gifs. I got a few funny looks from some of the other photographers! The resulting GIFs and photographs were met with a lot of enthusiasm and the festival invited me back the following year to shoot a GIF portrait series of the line-up.
GIFs are a great medium as they’re a perfect bridge between the world of photography and film-making. Even though there’s been an explosion of GIF making apps released it’s definitely a skill and there’s only a handful of creatives who’ve mastered the art of the GIF.
You are also a strong film-over-digital advocate. Can you explain, with your experience and photographer point of view, the difference between the two?
Digital is great, but I can’t help feeling that anyone can take a great photo with the same DSLR camera and lens. The individual creative force and identity get lost. I feel lazier when i have a digital camera whereas I’m far more considered with film. When you start shooting on film you realise there’s nothing quite like it; the colour, the warmth and the texture are captivating. You’ve become creative whether you intended to or not!
Film is a bit like a fingerprint. The moment the shutter button is pressed creates something completely unique. The resulting photograph is dependant on so many factors. The temperature, film type, the light, the lens, your mood and even your breathing. It’s almost impossible to replicate that moment. That's really exciting. That’s what makes it an art form. And that’s what drew me in.
You shoot more music-related events than anything fashion. Are you more music than fashion in your personal life as well?
I have a lot of friends who are musicians and I love music so I was naturally drawn towards documenting these kinds of events. It’s also been a great way to hone my craft as well as experiment.
"The ideal situation for me and most artists is to be able to balance commercial work with creative projects. An artist has always had to adapt to survive and it's becoming harder than ever!" [Kate Bones]
Your Liam Hodges GIFs, shot backstage the brand’s Autumn-Winter 2016 fashion show in London, caught a lot of attention! Do you plan on extending your experience in fashion, by linking up with another clothing brand or fashion magazine?
I've actually worked with Liam since the London Collections Men shoot and hopefully we'll work on some more projects together. Prior to this, I made some GIFs with Clio Peppiatt which were really fun and very different to my previous work. I have also shot street style for ASOS and I am currently editing a GIF series I shot for Hunger Magazine this week, directed by the lovely Elizabeth Jane Bishop. So, yes, I’d love to work with other fashion brands and designers!
When did brands start to express interest in your work? How did they approach you?
It first started in September last year with a Red Bull commission to create a GIF portrait series of 24 creatives aged under 24 years old. They’d seen the artist GIF portraits I had shot for Simple Things festival. Shortly after, Converse commissioned me to make a series of GIFs for their ‘Made by You’ campaign.
Ever since then I’ve been really busy. I’ve just finished a GIF for the Grammys to represent Ed Sheeran’s song ‘Thinking out Loud’. I love challenges and trying new things.
Do you see yourself being more than a one-time collaborator, i.e. being employed full or part-time as a creative consultant for a brand, an organization or an agency?
I have no preconceptions about what I might do in the future. If it’s an interesting project, I’ll take it on.
As such, would you feel like you gave up your freedom as an artist? Or do you think you’d be able to keep it regardless?
The ideal situation for me and most artists is to be able to balance commercial work with creative projects. An artist has always had to adapt to survive and it's becoming harder than ever! At first I was a little apprehensive about working with big brands but it's been an eye opening experience.
When a brand is into what you do and they can see your potential, the platform they give you to create can be incredibly important to your personal development. My first big project with Red Bull was exciting and challenging. The team were incredibly supportive and enthusiastic about my GIF portrait work and the commission was for a big series so it was new territory for all of us. Thankfully It was well received and I've continued to work with them on other projects since.
Subsequently I believe I can be as creative working with brands as I can be with my own work. I'm genuinely looking forward to what I'll make in 2016, whether it's another a portraits series for a personal project or a set of rotoscoped animations for a big brand.
What would your dream project be?
I love musicians like PJ Harvey and Bjork who collaborate intensively on all aspects with one or more visual artists to create a whole package for an album. Video, artwork, photography, clothes etc. This creative process makes a lot of sense to me. It elevates the project to a higher level which is incredibly rewarding for everyone involved, fans included. It puts the musician back in control of their work and out of the hands of corporate labels and pushy management who follow a prescribed set of rules.
Fortunately the rise of social media has enabled artists and musicians to independently publish their work with minimal financial cost plus network and collaborate with ease.
There's never been a better time to be creative and inspired.
What’s next for Kate Bones? Should we look out for new videos? More collaborations? An exhibition?
I’d love to have a GIF exhibition! That would be very cool. It’s something I’ve thought about. The next big thing is a couple of music videos. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a while and a couple of the right songs by the right artists have just come along. There will also be more GIF-making. I’ll never stop GIF-ing! I’m Queen La GIF-AH!
By Iggy Nko, from issue #3
www.katebones.com
Photo by Jennifer Lo