Juun.J

Juun.J

You had a good start to 2016, by presenting your collection at Piti Uomo as guest of honor. Do you think this is a major step in you career? In which city would you like to present your upcoming collections? Why?
As I watched the Raf Simons Show at Piti Uomo in 2005, I wondered if I could ever hold a show there with my own brand some day. Itwas one of the chances that helped me renew myself with higher expectation for the future and stronger commitment to my work. In this sense, having been invited to Pitti Uomo and having hosted my show as a guest designer does meansomething to me. As for the brand, the show will mark a milestone in its stride towards the global market, especially given that it was presented amidst the current global menswear trend. As always, the collections will be presented in Paris. It’s not an overstatement that Juun.J was born in Paris. And it would be an even greater honor if I am invited to Pitti Uomo once again.
As the first generation of Korean creators in the 90’s (Jim Teok, Lee Young-Hee or Lie-Sang-Bong), you chose Paris since 2007 for your shows. Why? Do you think the French capital still has its past aura?
It is because Paris is the most creative city in the world. Paris is a city that gives credit to creativity and unique identity to each designer regardless of his/her nationality and age. The period running up to my first show in Paris can be described as a time of reflection to find and establish something “uniquely me,” and the collections I present now are the fruits of such a time. As Paris has always drawn those like me who wish to develop an identity and express creativity, it will remain the most creative city like ever before.
Korean culture became global with the emergence of K-pop and K-art. How do you explain that? What do you think of this development? And for the K-fashion?
The global popularity and fandom of K-pop, Korean TV shows and beauty products has first allowed Korea to benefit from Asian consumers with a strong spending power. Then the trend expanded over to European and American markets. In the examples of influential fashion powerhouses like Japan and Belgium, it was their culture that first went global and then their fashion-followed suit, so the global expansion of Korean culture can be seen as a positive signal for K-fashion as well. K-fashion has just started to take its baby steps in going global compared to some other cultures, but a promising future may be awaiting ahead of it with a number of Korean designers gaining spotlight on the global fashion scene.
Seoul is becoming a real cornerstone of modernity. Do you agree with this ? According to you, what are the reasons? And what is needed to evolve even more?
Seoul is a city where the past, the present and the future coexist. The fast-paced, ever-changing city is one of the earliest adopters of new technology and has no hesitation in accepting new elements to its culture. This is what’s behind the attention recently paid to Seoul. Put it simply, Seoul is a dynamic digital powerhouse.
What perception did you have of the uniform during your military service? What did it represent for you at that time? What does it represent and inspire today?
In the 60’s and 70’s, the areas surrounding the U.S. forces in Korea were like a furnace of cultural trends of the time. Over time, blended with more general Korean pop culture, the presence of US forces played a major role in creating a new wave in the history of Korean culture. Military service is mandatory in Korea and I myself also did my share serving in the army for three years. At the time, I really hated the uniforms because I thought they didn’t look good at all. But once I was discharged after three years of service, I started to notice how practical and beautiful they actually are. Now I am increasingly applying military elements or concepts to my discipline.
How do you express your creativity outside of work ? What are you passionate about ? What do you do outside of the workshop?
The source of inspiration for my collections is always “classic.”
More specifically, breaking out of the conventional norms of classic male clothing and reinterpreting it to create a whole new concept of “classic” is the inspiration and purpose of my work. Another major source of inspiration is “people.” I have a habit of carefully observing people on the street. Not only trend- setters but even seniors wearing an old jacket or a coat from the 20’s or 30’s gives me inspiration. I spend most of my free time gardening and prefer to enjoy some quite time with my companion dog.
Where does your obsession with contrast come from? What does it represent for you?
It is inspired by my own aesthetic taste and standard. Personally, I don’t like something vague. I love something explicit in contrast and proportion. The same aesthetic eye applies when I appreciate art, photography and interior design.
Is oversize a futuristic form or a unisex approach of clothes? Maybe both of them?
Both. Oversize was very popular in the 80’s and early 90’s. Of course, a trend of a specific time is best appreciated in the context of that particular time. Although the (oversize) trend may just pass by for now, it will come again for sure in 30 years.
"It is because Paris is the most creative city in the world. Paris is a city that gives credit to creativity and unique identity to each designer regardless of his/her nationality and age." [Juun.J]
Is gender confusion in fashion a new rule ? Do you believe in a genderfluid future of fashion? Why did you choose a unisex vision from the beginning? Do you think it is the key to your success?
The culture, values and phenomenon surrounding gender has an impact on fashion. We are not living in an era where a man is only expected
to be masculine while a woman feminine. The boundary has been blurred between men and women whether it is about profession or roles in society. Fashion is no exception. Juun.J fall-winter 16 concept is “Less” representing a collection that brings down all the walls of preconception associated with nationality, ethnicity and gender. Passion for something new is the power that moves fashion. That being said, the notion of gender built in a pre-defined frame should not be considered inviolable. Rather, paradoxically, it is a notion that can be reconstructed by deliberately blurring the boundary.
Monochrome tones take a major place in your work, but in fact, do you prefer black or white? What representaton do you have of those two tones? Do you work them in the same way?
It is too difficult to choose between black and white. I can’t say I prefer one over the other as I love both so much. My appetite for striking contrast also comes from this. Black and white implies the meaning of transcending ethnicity and gender. And it is a futuristic color.
By various collaborations in your collections you underline your interest of art. Why? What do you want to express? Art and fashion are necessarily linked?
I have quite an interest in surrealistic artwork as something uncertain and mysterious has always been a catalyst for my inspiration. Something that looks real but doesn’t really exist......this is what’s also found in the work of the artists I partnered with through collaboration. The artwork goes beyond what it is originally about when it is presented on runway or expressed on a piece of clothes. Just watching such an expansion of meaning is pleasing in itself. Fashion is necessarily linked with art, architecture and music respectively.
If you had to write a manifesto on fashion, how would you entitle it? How would it begin and end?
The manifesto would be entitled “Fashion design by artificial intelligence.” It would be about the confrontation between something intelligent and something emotional and the beginning and the ending would be connected in the same context.
Suzy Menkes says “Fashion is a way to express what happens in the world”. How do you interpret this sentence? According to you, what does fashion say about our world? And what does your fashion say about our world?
I believe what Suzy Menkes said implies that fashion reflects zeitgeist, the cultural and political trend as well as the public sentiment of the time. I believe fashion is a means to express who you are as a person. Fashion that delivers the wearer’s taste and attitude serves as a tool to make himself happy and attractive. Juun.J is not about what to wear, but about how to wear.
In an industry where you have to balance between renewal and keeping the same line, what are your solutions to be new? What is the best symbol of your novelty?
As explained above, the identity of Juun.J lies in “reinterpretation of classic.” This approach is rooted in the belief that reinterpreting something familiar and known in the unique Juun.J way will ironically lead to creating something totally new to our eyes.
Have you ever been approached by a Luxury brand to be their AD? If the answer is yes, why did you refuse? If no, would you like to do that?
For now, I want to be fully dedicated to Juun.J.
Being part of Samsung probably offers you the possibilty to create links between fashion and technology. Which projects do you want to develop in this area?
I have an idea to integrate wearable devices to Juun.J as long as they are comfortable and easy to wear. I guess it would take some time to put it into reality.
A little word on your spring-summer 2017 collection?
YOUTH.
From Issue #4 by Perceval Vincent
Photographe PAUL FRANCO
Styliste CLEMENCE CAHU @ Slowdance
Model KEARVINA @ Ford
Make up FREDERIQUE VAN ESPEN @ Aurélien
Hair CHRISTOS VOURLIS

Juun.J

You had a good start to 2016, by presenting your collection at Piti Uomo as guest of honor. Do you think this is a major step in you career? In which city would you like to present your upcoming collections? Why?
As I watched the Raf Simons Show at Piti Uomo in 2005, I wondered if I could ever hold a show there with my own brand some day. Itwas one of the chances that helped me renew myself with higher expectation for the future and stronger commitment to my work. In this sense, having been invited to Pitti Uomo and having hosted my show as a guest designer does meansomething to me. As for the brand, the show will mark a milestone in its stride towards the global market, especially given that it was presented amidst the current global menswear trend. As always, the collections will be presented in Paris. It’s not an overstatement that Juun.J was born in Paris. And it would be an even greater honor if I am invited to Pitti Uomo once again.
As the first generation of Korean creators in the 90’s (Jim Teok, Lee Young-Hee or Lie-Sang-Bong), you chose Paris since 2007 for your shows. Why? Do you think the French capital still has its past aura?
It is because Paris is the most creative city in the world. Paris is a city that gives credit to creativity and unique identity to each designer regardless of his/her nationality and age. The period running up to my first show in Paris can be described as a time of reflection to find and establish something “uniquely me,” and the collections I present now are the fruits of such a time. As Paris has always drawn those like me who wish to develop an identity and express creativity, it will remain the most creative city like ever before.
Korean culture became global with the emergence of K-pop and K-art. How do you explain that? What do you think of this development? And for the K-fashion?
The global popularity and fandom of K-pop, Korean TV shows and beauty products has first allowed Korea to benefit from Asian consumers with a strong spending power. Then the trend expanded over to European and American markets. In the examples of influential fashion powerhouses like Japan and Belgium, it was their culture that first went global and then their fashion-followed suit, so the global expansion of Korean culture can be seen as a positive signal for K-fashion as well. K-fashion has just started to take its baby steps in going global compared to some other cultures, but a promising future may be awaiting ahead of it with a number of Korean designers gaining spotlight on the global fashion scene.
Seoul is becoming a real cornerstone of modernity. Do you agree with this ? According to you, what are the reasons? And what is needed to evolve even more?
Seoul is a city where the past, the present and the future coexist. The fast-paced, ever-changing city is one of the earliest adopters of new technology and has no hesitation in accepting new elements to its culture. This is what’s behind the attention recently paid to Seoul. Put it simply, Seoul is a dynamic digital powerhouse.
What perception did you have of the uniform during your military service? What did it represent for you at that time? What does it represent and inspire today?
In the 60’s and 70’s, the areas surrounding the U.S. forces in Korea were like a furnace of cultural trends of the time. Over time, blended with more general Korean pop culture, the presence of US forces played a major role in creating a new wave in the history of Korean culture. Military service is mandatory in Korea and I myself also did my share serving in the army for three years. At the time, I really hated the uniforms because I thought they didn’t look good at all. But once I was discharged after three years of service, I started to notice how practical and beautiful they actually are. Now I am increasingly applying military elements or concepts to my discipline.
How do you express your creativity outside of work ? What are you passionate about ? What do you do outside of the workshop?
The source of inspiration for my collections is always “classic.”
More specifically, breaking out of the conventional norms of classic male clothing and reinterpreting it to create a whole new concept of “classic” is the inspiration and purpose of my work. Another major source of inspiration is “people.” I have a habit of carefully observing people on the street. Not only trend- setters but even seniors wearing an old jacket or a coat from the 20’s or 30’s gives me inspiration. I spend most of my free time gardening and prefer to enjoy some quite time with my companion dog.
Where does your obsession with contrast come from? What does it represent for you?
It is inspired by my own aesthetic taste and standard. Personally, I don’t like something vague. I love something explicit in contrast and proportion. The same aesthetic eye applies when I appreciate art, photography and interior design.
Is oversize a futuristic form or a unisex approach of clothes? Maybe both of them?
Both. Oversize was very popular in the 80’s and early 90’s. Of course, a trend of a specific time is best appreciated in the context of that particular time. Although the (oversize) trend may just pass by for now, it will come again for sure in 30 years.
"It is because Paris is the most creative city in the world. Paris is a city that gives credit to creativity and unique identity to each designer regardless of his/her nationality and age." [Juun.J]
Is gender confusion in fashion a new rule ? Do you believe in a genderfluid future of fashion? Why did you choose a unisex vision from the beginning? Do you think it is the key to your success?
The culture, values and phenomenon surrounding gender has an impact on fashion. We are not living in an era where a man is only expected
to be masculine while a woman feminine. The boundary has been blurred between men and women whether it is about profession or roles in society. Fashion is no exception. Juun.J fall-winter 16 concept is “Less” representing a collection that brings down all the walls of preconception associated with nationality, ethnicity and gender. Passion for something new is the power that moves fashion. That being said, the notion of gender built in a pre-defined frame should not be considered inviolable. Rather, paradoxically, it is a notion that can be reconstructed by deliberately blurring the boundary.
Monochrome tones take a major place in your work, but in fact, do you prefer black or white? What representaton do you have of those two tones? Do you work them in the same way?
It is too difficult to choose between black and white. I can’t say I prefer one over the other as I love both so much. My appetite for striking contrast also comes from this. Black and white implies the meaning of transcending ethnicity and gender. And it is a futuristic color.
By various collaborations in your collections you underline your interest of art. Why? What do you want to express? Art and fashion are necessarily linked?
I have quite an interest in surrealistic artwork as something uncertain and mysterious has always been a catalyst for my inspiration. Something that looks real but doesn’t really exist......this is what’s also found in the work of the artists I partnered with through collaboration. The artwork goes beyond what it is originally about when it is presented on runway or expressed on a piece of clothes. Just watching such an expansion of meaning is pleasing in itself. Fashion is necessarily linked with art, architecture and music respectively.
If you had to write a manifesto on fashion, how would you entitle it? How would it begin and end?
The manifesto would be entitled “Fashion design by artificial intelligence.” It would be about the confrontation between something intelligent and something emotional and the beginning and the ending would be connected in the same context.
Suzy Menkes says “Fashion is a way to express what happens in the world”. How do you interpret this sentence? According to you, what does fashion say about our world? And what does your fashion say about our world?
I believe what Suzy Menkes said implies that fashion reflects zeitgeist, the cultural and political trend as well as the public sentiment of the time. I believe fashion is a means to express who you are as a person. Fashion that delivers the wearer’s taste and attitude serves as a tool to make himself happy and attractive. Juun.J is not about what to wear, but about how to wear.
In an industry where you have to balance between renewal and keeping the same line, what are your solutions to be new? What is the best symbol of your novelty?
As explained above, the identity of Juun.J lies in “reinterpretation of classic.” This approach is rooted in the belief that reinterpreting something familiar and known in the unique Juun.J way will ironically lead to creating something totally new to our eyes.
Have you ever been approached by a Luxury brand to be their AD? If the answer is yes, why did you refuse? If no, would you like to do that?
For now, I want to be fully dedicated to Juun.J.
Being part of Samsung probably offers you the possibilty to create links between fashion and technology. Which projects do you want to develop in this area?
I have an idea to integrate wearable devices to Juun.J as long as they are comfortable and easy to wear. I guess it would take some time to put it into reality.
A little word on your spring-summer 2017 collection?
YOUTH.
From Issue #4 by Perceval Vincent
Photographe PAUL FRANCO
Styliste CLEMENCE CAHU @ Slowdance
Model KEARVINA @ Ford
Make up FREDERIQUE VAN ESPEN @ Aurélien
Hair CHRISTOS VOURLIS