Ground Effect

Ground Effect

Why did you create Ground Effect?
The initial idea was to create a platform for showcasing young artists around us. The “white cube” concept of traditional galleries didn’t fit with our vision of an “artistic hub” inhabited by figures from the urban art scene.
The whole concept was also driven by the different people we met, and our contrasting backgrounds and lives. Ground Effect was therefore born organically, with each person contributing something to make it the place of art, dialogue and exchange it has become today. We didn’t map out our approach; we were really just inspired by the artistic niche that Paris failed to fill. We wanted to create an undefinable, shifting space where anything and everything is possible.
What sets the gallery apart from the rest?
Ground Effect is an underground labyrinth filled with rooms you can wander through at your leisure. Even regulars discover something new every time, as the space is in a constant state of renewal. Ground Effect’s biggest advantage is that it hasn’t lost its street identity. You can easily get lost, and everything is constantly changing and growing. It’s all fleeting. In fact, as well as the collectors and artists themselves, we also have a group of fans who have followed the gallery’s journey since it first opened in 2016. Everyone is welcome to pop by and have a beer, and each room opens your eyes a little more to the outside world. It feels good being there.
What has been one of the highlights so far?
To be honest, the whole enthusiastic response to Ground Effect, and the energy of the space itself. There are always lots of people there, and each person working in the gallery enjoys their work – it’s a real labour of love.
The diversity of the exhibitions and the artists we present means you can be completely taken aback by a certain work of art or concept. And that has been our goal from the start – thinking outside the box and escaping given standards. That’s what speaks to people most.
As well as the gallery, we also have a shop that makes art more accessible while also offering the artists, the gallery, and the visitors a whole range of possibilities.
What is the gallery currently exhibiting?
At the moment we are exhibiting the work of Babs, one of the gallery’s artists in residence. He was born in 1975, and discovered graffiti at the age of 11. He taught himself the ropes, and joined the biggest crews of the time such as 3HC, DSP, UV and TPK. Babs then entered the art market via the Artcurial auction house in 2008, and also made a name for himself with “legal” exhibitions such as Graffiti, état des lieux at the Galerie du Jour. Around the same time, he was also commissioned to create a large-scale piece of art by Agnès B, and took part in the Lascot Project at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris.
Today, we are presenting a lesser-known side to his work and showcasing his personality through the Les autres moi exhibition from 15 to 31 March 2018. The artist is presenting his street-based work on canvases for the very first time, and revealing abstract art steeped in history and emotion. As part of this creative phase, he has drawn inspiration from cubism, minimalism, graphic novels (including the work of illustrator Philippe Druillet), manga, and cartoons such as Akira and Grendizer. The biomechanical aesthetic seen in his work is a dual representation of the present and the future. Babs creates constantly, and never stops reinventing and perfecting his art. Come along and see for yourself!
How does the market see street art compared with other disciplines?
In art history terms, street art is very recent. It first began in the 1960s, after all. There is still a lot of debate surrounding its exact definition, its limits, and its key dates. One of the main questions is about street art in galleries. The very essence of this art form is its presence in the street, and its illegal creation by a minority using it to make a statement or simply reappropriate a collective space. Those are the reasons why this category of art is still constructing itself and carving out its niche in the market.
Do you sell clothing?
We have considered it, and we may well start soon. The idea would be to promote clothing that corresponds most to what we love and who we are.
[Ground Effect]
Anish Kapoor said that “as an artist, I have nothing to say.” Do you?
Saying something means communicating an idea. And from there, even “nothing” becomes something. As I see it, Anish Kapoor does have things to say! Some artists tag their names, while other paint white canvases with white paint. The main thing is to enjoy yourself, make others happy, and above all inspire a reaction – whether positive or negative.
Once a piece of art is presented in a public space, does it still belong to its creator?
As soon as art is created in a public space, it belongs to everyone – the creator included, but it is no more theirs than anyone else’s. That’s what I like the most about urban art, this idea of sharing, spreading to the people, and removing the high-brow holiness of art. I like the fact it is accessible and available to everyone. You just have to want to see it to access it.
One of Banksy’s pieces was recently removed from the wall and “stolen” in England. What do you think about it?
As I mentioned before, if Banksy chose a public space as a medium for his work, then it wasn’t “stolen.” Street art is ephemeral by definition. It grows and develops with the street, and so of course it’s prone to damage. The thing that bothers me is that by making this public art private, you take away from what it means. It’s a shame.
Is this year set to be super busy?
Incredibly busy! We’re currently showcasing Babs’ work, and we organize new exhibitions every month. The Ground Effect team will be working on four new exhibitions between now and the end of August. There will be three solo shows (Bebar, Bockhaus and Ko), and a group show. Then, in September, a new adventure will begin!

Ground Effect

Why did you create Ground Effect?
The initial idea was to create a platform for showcasing young artists around us. The “white cube” concept of traditional galleries didn’t fit with our vision of an “artistic hub” inhabited by figures from the urban art scene.
The whole concept was also driven by the different people we met, and our contrasting backgrounds and lives. Ground Effect was therefore born organically, with each person contributing something to make it the place of art, dialogue and exchange it has become today. We didn’t map out our approach; we were really just inspired by the artistic niche that Paris failed to fill. We wanted to create an undefinable, shifting space where anything and everything is possible.
What sets the gallery apart from the rest?
Ground Effect is an underground labyrinth filled with rooms you can wander through at your leisure. Even regulars discover something new every time, as the space is in a constant state of renewal. Ground Effect’s biggest advantage is that it hasn’t lost its street identity. You can easily get lost, and everything is constantly changing and growing. It’s all fleeting. In fact, as well as the collectors and artists themselves, we also have a group of fans who have followed the gallery’s journey since it first opened in 2016. Everyone is welcome to pop by and have a beer, and each room opens your eyes a little more to the outside world. It feels good being there.
What has been one of the highlights so far?
To be honest, the whole enthusiastic response to Ground Effect, and the energy of the space itself. There are always lots of people there, and each person working in the gallery enjoys their work – it’s a real labour of love.
The diversity of the exhibitions and the artists we present means you can be completely taken aback by a certain work of art or concept. And that has been our goal from the start – thinking outside the box and escaping given standards. That’s what speaks to people most.
As well as the gallery, we also have a shop that makes art more accessible while also offering the artists, the gallery, and the visitors a whole range of possibilities.
What is the gallery currently exhibiting?
At the moment we are exhibiting the work of Babs, one of the gallery’s artists in residence. He was born in 1975, and discovered graffiti at the age of 11. He taught himself the ropes, and joined the biggest crews of the time such as 3HC, DSP, UV and TPK. Babs then entered the art market via the Artcurial auction house in 2008, and also made a name for himself with “legal” exhibitions such as Graffiti, état des lieux at the Galerie du Jour. Around the same time, he was also commissioned to create a large-scale piece of art by Agnès B, and took part in the Lascot Project at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris.
Today, we are presenting a lesser-known side to his work and showcasing his personality through the Les autres moi exhibition from 15 to 31 March 2018. The artist is presenting his street-based work on canvases for the very first time, and revealing abstract art steeped in history and emotion. As part of this creative phase, he has drawn inspiration from cubism, minimalism, graphic novels (including the work of illustrator Philippe Druillet), manga, and cartoons such as Akira and Grendizer. The biomechanical aesthetic seen in his work is a dual representation of the present and the future. Babs creates constantly, and never stops reinventing and perfecting his art. Come along and see for yourself!
How does the market see street art compared with other disciplines?
In art history terms, street art is very recent. It first began in the 1960s, after all. There is still a lot of debate surrounding its exact definition, its limits, and its key dates. One of the main questions is about street art in galleries. The very essence of this art form is its presence in the street, and its illegal creation by a minority using it to make a statement or simply reappropriate a collective space. Those are the reasons why this category of art is still constructing itself and carving out its niche in the market.
Do you sell clothing?
We have considered it, and we may well start soon. The idea would be to promote clothing that corresponds most to what we love and who we are.
[Ground Effect]
Anish Kapoor said that “as an artist, I have nothing to say.” Do you?
Saying something means communicating an idea. And from there, even “nothing” becomes something. As I see it, Anish Kapoor does have things to say! Some artists tag their names, while other paint white canvases with white paint. The main thing is to enjoy yourself, make others happy, and above all inspire a reaction – whether positive or negative.
Once a piece of art is presented in a public space, does it still belong to its creator?
As soon as art is created in a public space, it belongs to everyone – the creator included, but it is no more theirs than anyone else’s. That’s what I like the most about urban art, this idea of sharing, spreading to the people, and removing the high-brow holiness of art. I like the fact it is accessible and available to everyone. You just have to want to see it to access it.
One of Banksy’s pieces was recently removed from the wall and “stolen” in England. What do you think about it?
As I mentioned before, if Banksy chose a public space as a medium for his work, then it wasn’t “stolen.” Street art is ephemeral by definition. It grows and develops with the street, and so of course it’s prone to damage. The thing that bothers me is that by making this public art private, you take away from what it means. It’s a shame.
Is this year set to be super busy?
Incredibly busy! We’re currently showcasing Babs’ work, and we organize new exhibitions every month. The Ground Effect team will be working on four new exhibitions between now and the end of August. There will be three solo shows (Bebar, Bockhaus and Ko), and a group show. Then, in September, a new adventure will begin!