Dudley O’Shaughnessy

Dudley O’Shaughnessy

Can you introduce yourself to the readers of dull magazine?
Hello, my name is Dudley JUMAANE O’Shaughnessy. That’s the first time I’ve openly told anyone who isn’t close to me my full name.
You star in the movie « White Colour Black », directed and written by Joseph A. Ade-sunloye. How was the filming and when is it coming out?
It was great, I couldn’t have asked for anything more challenging as my first leading role, I was really put through my paces physically and mentally. Joseph is a brilliant director, I trust him. He is able to really connect with me on a cer-tain level and create an environment
to where I can really live, and be completely in the moment.
It’s going to be submitted to film festivals before general release. The first one will be the Toronto International Film Festival, taking place between the 8th and 18th of September 2016.
Your character, Leke, a successful London-based photographer, travels to Senegal to bury his father and rediscover a culture he has long forgotten. As a young mixed man yourself, do you relate in any way to the plot and the man you portray?
Yes I do, I am a Londoner through and through, so I really understood and felt the differences between here and Senegal, and what both parts of the world teach you about life as a whole, especially as he was heavily involved within the fashion industry. I could really feel him and understand the baggage he carried and how it externally manifested
his behaviour, and also how strong the oppo-sing force needed to be in order to balance him out and bring him to a new stage of understanding.
Have you always been interested in movies or ever thought about pursuing a career in the film industry?
I’ve ALWAYS been interested. I knew someday in the back of my head I’d pur-sue a career in it, I just wasn’t sure when.
Before walking your first steps as a lead character on the silver screen, you made a name for yourself in modelling. How did you get approached and what convinced you to give it a shot?
I was approached in London, Old Street. It was something that a few people had said I should give a try, but I never took any notice of it. But when I was scouted and went into the agency it was something
I had never seen before, and that interested me a lot.
Boxing was all I really knew, and
I was losing heart in that, so after being ranked number one at my weight class in England, to then not getting on to the national boxing team I decided to pursue modelling full-time, knowing that this could lead me onto acting. So you could say modelling and boxing were a vital part of my acting training.
What was your first modelling job?
It’s funny you ask that question, it makes me realize how strong my connection to Africa is. My first modelling job was for Ozwald Boateng in Lagos, Nigeria for the Fashion Week.
For a few years, the profession has been under fire for its lack of diversity, as fashion regularly deals with accusations of racism and discrimination. Have you ever experienced it or felt a strange vibe during a casting, a photoshoot, etc?
Yes I’ve felt rejected during a casting, not so much a photoshoot, but I’ve had my moments. But racism or no racism — modelling
is cut-throat and its something you just have to deal with.
"With social media, it’s coming down to whom you are individually more than what you look like, and that’s good because i’m tired of there being a certain requirement of height, size and appearance in order to be on the front of a magazine or on a campaign." [Dudley O’Shaughnessy]
Brands, designers, the media or talent agencies: who is to blame —if anyone— and is there a solution to this problem of diversity?
I think everyone is to thank, and not blame. I believe modelling is
at a huge turning point right now to being more diverse. With social media, it’s coming down to whom you are individually more than what you look like, and that’s good because i’m tired of there being a certain requirement of height, size and appearance in order to be on the front of a magazine or on a campaign. Before you could just look pretty but now it comes down to character, and what you actually do and how you conduct yourself.
Talking about designers, you seem to be one of Olivier Rousteing’s favorite faces to work with. You regularly take part in Balmain fashion shows and ad campaigns and are also fea-tured in the NikeLab x Olivier Rousteing editorial. How did you develop such a close work relationship?
Through the forces of nature. I feel more than anything Olivier sees and understands who I am, and being a designer of mixed heritage I guess he also sees himself and his story in me, and I am very thankful to him for letting me represent that.
You have risen to stardom since the release of Rihanna’s We Found Love music video. Are you concerned about people knowing you for this role and nothing else?
Not at all, I am grateful for it. It was a perfect beginning for my acting career. I used to be affected by being pointed at as THAT person, but I can’t blame people because it’s all they know. It’s a good thing it’s happened because it’s made my character stronger, and helped drive me into being an even better actor.
The job of modelling has changed a lot in the last few years, mainly because of social media. How do you use this platform?
Yes It has. I use it to share and help myself to be open by posting recent work and also what’s truly on my mind. If you look at my Instagram (@dud8ley) you’ll see what I mean.
It seems like today, the most- followed models are the most- requested. Is the number of followers fashion’s new unit of measurement?
Yes, it’s moving that way.
Years prior to your first model and acting experiences, you grew up a promising boxing champion. Who introduced you to this sport, what were you hoping to become in boxing and what made you give it up?
My father introduced me, his old boxing trophies used to be my Action Man fi-gurines. Then I used to watch my older brother train
as much as I could until I was old enough —you had to be 9— to join them. I was hoping to become Olympic champion at the 2012 games in London, or even 2016. My dream of being an actor made me give it up, I always wanted to give it a shot so it was hard to allow myself to commit fully to just boxing.
Are you up on boxing news? Floyd Mayweather, Jr.’s possible comeback, Canelo Álvarez’s K.O. victory on Amir Khan, the 2016 Rio, Brazil Olympic Games?
No one will beat Mayweather, period. I don’t follow it as much
as I used to but when I watch it, it makes me miss it a lot. I did watched the Canelo & Khan fight, I have a lot of respect for Khan as he always challenges himself, a true warrior. And yes, I’ll be watching the 2016 Rio games as much as It hurts. My father, Brian O’Shaughnessy, is a trainer and one of his fighters will fight representing Great Britain. His name is Lawrence Okolie at Heavyweight. Watch out for him, he’s exceptional!
From issue #4
By Iggy NKo

Photographer JAESUNG LEE
Stylist SUE CHOI

- T-shirt JEFFREY RUDES, shorts SIMON MILLER
- Coat FENDI, shirt THE KOOPLES, sneakers ARTICLE NUMBER, slacks Jeffrey Rudes
- Blazer JEFFREY RUDES, slacks THE KOOPLES

Dudley O’Shaughnessy

Can you introduce yourself to the readers of dull magazine?
Hello, my name is Dudley JUMAANE O’Shaughnessy. That’s the first time I’ve openly told anyone who isn’t close to me my full name.
You star in the movie « White Colour Black », directed and written by Joseph A. Ade-sunloye. How was the filming and when is it coming out?
It was great, I couldn’t have asked for anything more challenging as my first leading role, I was really put through my paces physically and mentally. Joseph is a brilliant director, I trust him. He is able to really connect with me on a cer-tain level and create an environment
to where I can really live, and be completely in the moment.
It’s going to be submitted to film festivals before general release. The first one will be the Toronto International Film Festival, taking place between the 8th and 18th of September 2016.
Your character, Leke, a successful London-based photographer, travels to Senegal to bury his father and rediscover a culture he has long forgotten. As a young mixed man yourself, do you relate in any way to the plot and the man you portray?
Yes I do, I am a Londoner through and through, so I really understood and felt the differences between here and Senegal, and what both parts of the world teach you about life as a whole, especially as he was heavily involved within the fashion industry. I could really feel him and understand the baggage he carried and how it externally manifested
his behaviour, and also how strong the oppo-sing force needed to be in order to balance him out and bring him to a new stage of understanding.
Have you always been interested in movies or ever thought about pursuing a career in the film industry?
I’ve ALWAYS been interested. I knew someday in the back of my head I’d pur-sue a career in it, I just wasn’t sure when.
Before walking your first steps as a lead character on the silver screen, you made a name for yourself in modelling. How did you get approached and what convinced you to give it a shot?
I was approached in London, Old Street. It was something that a few people had said I should give a try, but I never took any notice of it. But when I was scouted and went into the agency it was something
I had never seen before, and that interested me a lot.
Boxing was all I really knew, and
I was losing heart in that, so after being ranked number one at my weight class in England, to then not getting on to the national boxing team I decided to pursue modelling full-time, knowing that this could lead me onto acting. So you could say modelling and boxing were a vital part of my acting training.
What was your first modelling job?
It’s funny you ask that question, it makes me realize how strong my connection to Africa is. My first modelling job was for Ozwald Boateng in Lagos, Nigeria for the Fashion Week.
For a few years, the profession has been under fire for its lack of diversity, as fashion regularly deals with accusations of racism and discrimination. Have you ever experienced it or felt a strange vibe during a casting, a photoshoot, etc?
Yes I’ve felt rejected during a casting, not so much a photoshoot, but I’ve had my moments. But racism or no racism — modelling
is cut-throat and its something you just have to deal with.
"With social media, it’s coming down to whom you are individually more than what you look like, and that’s good because i’m tired of there being a certain requirement of height, size and appearance in order to be on the front of a magazine or on a campaign." [Dudley O’Shaughnessy]
Brands, designers, the media or talent agencies: who is to blame —if anyone— and is there a solution to this problem of diversity?
I think everyone is to thank, and not blame. I believe modelling is
at a huge turning point right now to being more diverse. With social media, it’s coming down to whom you are individually more than what you look like, and that’s good because i’m tired of there being a certain requirement of height, size and appearance in order to be on the front of a magazine or on a campaign. Before you could just look pretty but now it comes down to character, and what you actually do and how you conduct yourself.
Talking about designers, you seem to be one of Olivier Rousteing’s favorite faces to work with. You regularly take part in Balmain fashion shows and ad campaigns and are also fea-tured in the NikeLab x Olivier Rousteing editorial. How did you develop such a close work relationship?
Through the forces of nature. I feel more than anything Olivier sees and understands who I am, and being a designer of mixed heritage I guess he also sees himself and his story in me, and I am very thankful to him for letting me represent that.
You have risen to stardom since the release of Rihanna’s We Found Love music video. Are you concerned about people knowing you for this role and nothing else?
Not at all, I am grateful for it. It was a perfect beginning for my acting career. I used to be affected by being pointed at as THAT person, but I can’t blame people because it’s all they know. It’s a good thing it’s happened because it’s made my character stronger, and helped drive me into being an even better actor.
The job of modelling has changed a lot in the last few years, mainly because of social media. How do you use this platform?
Yes It has. I use it to share and help myself to be open by posting recent work and also what’s truly on my mind. If you look at my Instagram (@dud8ley) you’ll see what I mean.
It seems like today, the most- followed models are the most- requested. Is the number of followers fashion’s new unit of measurement?
Yes, it’s moving that way.
Years prior to your first model and acting experiences, you grew up a promising boxing champion. Who introduced you to this sport, what were you hoping to become in boxing and what made you give it up?
My father introduced me, his old boxing trophies used to be my Action Man fi-gurines. Then I used to watch my older brother train
as much as I could until I was old enough —you had to be 9— to join them. I was hoping to become Olympic champion at the 2012 games in London, or even 2016. My dream of being an actor made me give it up, I always wanted to give it a shot so it was hard to allow myself to commit fully to just boxing.
Are you up on boxing news? Floyd Mayweather, Jr.’s possible comeback, Canelo Álvarez’s K.O. victory on Amir Khan, the 2016 Rio, Brazil Olympic Games?
No one will beat Mayweather, period. I don’t follow it as much
as I used to but when I watch it, it makes me miss it a lot. I did watched the Canelo & Khan fight, I have a lot of respect for Khan as he always challenges himself, a true warrior. And yes, I’ll be watching the 2016 Rio games as much as It hurts. My father, Brian O’Shaughnessy, is a trainer and one of his fighters will fight representing Great Britain. His name is Lawrence Okolie at Heavyweight. Watch out for him, he’s exceptional!
From issue #4
By Iggy NKo

Photographer JAESUNG LEE
Stylist SUE CHOI

- T-shirt JEFFREY RUDES, shorts SIMON MILLER
- Coat FENDI, shirt THE KOOPLES, sneakers ARTICLE NUMBER, slacks Jeffrey Rudes
- Blazer JEFFREY RUDES, slacks THE KOOPLES