Astrid Andersen

Astrid Andersen

Astrid Andersen

There are a lot of men in womenswear, but a significantly smaller number of women in menswear. What lead you to want to design for men ? How has the experience been for you as a woman ?
For me it’s very natural. I know how I want men to look, what attracts me and what does not. I use this as a very important tool in my work. I find it a relief to not have to take myself into any consideration other than what attracts me. I use this as a very important tool in my work. I find it a relief to not have to take myself into any consideration other than what attracts me.
Sportswear is the epitome of comfort and functionality, words that aren’t usually ascribed to high fashion. However, your clothes seem to be the middle ground between the two. How do you merge sportswear and lux cohesively ?
between the two. How do you merge sportswear and lux cohesively ?
Comfort for me is very necessary for a man to look good. The thought of a man wearing something that is uncomfortable is very unsexy in my opinion. I am part of a generation that has grown up with a different perception of clothes. We all wore tracksuits to school in the nineties and somehow this grew into a love of comfort and a determination to make this high fashion. I mean, I don’t understand why not.
You have been quoted as saying that the word “unisex” is outdated. How do you conceptualize gender ? What role does gender play for you when designing your clothes ?
I design for men, but I also wear menswear myself and I don’t give it two thoughts when I pick it out. So for me, the terms are really no longer relevant, it’s just clothes. I love it when I see a person, man or woman, who has completely transformed my clothes into his or her own by styling it in ways I never would.
In sportswear, logos are paramount : the Nike “Swoosh,” the Jordan’s “Jumpman,” etc. are iconic imagery. How did you design your logo ? What does it represent to you ?
I did my logo about 5 years ago with a good friend Kristian Møller. I always wanted a logo because I love how connected you can feel to other people through a logo. It’s a symbol of your choices and lifestyle without saying a word. That has always fascinated me. It’s part of our generation to relate to logos and connect internationally through them.
I always wanted a logo because I love how connected you can feel to other people through a logo. It’s a symbol of your choices and lifestyle without saying a word. That has always fascinated me. It’s part of our generation to relate to logos and connect internationally through them. [Astrid Andersen]
You were recently nominated for a British Fashion Award in “Emerging Menswear.” What does this nomination mean to you?
I am very honoured to be nominated for this award. The love that I feel for London is very strong and for it to nominate me as one of their own makes me very emotional because it’s truly here that my creative mind is at peace.
You collaborated with ASAP Ferg earlier this year for a fashion film “Water,” showcasing your spring/summer 2016 line. How did the collaboration come about? What is your perception on the connection between music and fashion? Most importantly, what are you listening to currently?
Ferg and I have done projects before and I love him and his energy. Creatively, we feed off each other. We have the same references and mindset, so it’s always just a conversation. In this case, [it] led to a film clip - which for me wasn’t meant to be a fashion film because it wasn’t a lookbook or some hard attempt to be cool. It was just a vision of creativity and an inspirational moment for both of us that we wanted to share. That’s the relationship that exists for me between music and fashion. Yes, you see the pictures of artists wearing fashion but if there’s no real connection involved, it’s just an endorsement and I think my generation is tired of all of that. At the moment, I’m listening to Krept & Konan’s Long Way Home album and I still listen to Rocky’s A.L.L.A. and Rodeo by Travis Scott and JME’s Integrity.
You’re Danish by birth, studied in London, draw obvious inspiration from Asia and have shot some look-books in L.A. What kind of inspiration do you take from each place? Do you see your clothes as belonging to a specific place or having a more universal context?
My generation is international and we praise different cultures, color and expressions. This is a true inspiration to me and if I didn't engage in this myself, it would feel wrong to me. I love to travel. To me, it is the ultimate luxury to experience other cultures.
You dropped a line with Topman in 2014 and only a few months later debuted your most ornate work yet with a bespoke collection at New York Fashion Week. Where do you see the future of your brand? Do you want to continue to toe the line between high fashion and ready-to-wear or do you foresee yourself focusing on one?
I truly hope to define our own definition. Everything I do, I do it because I’m 100% committed and I love what I do. We have a strategy, but nothing is calculated in the sense that we see what the market wants. My ambition is to create something that the market will have to understand, whether it be fur coats or collaborations.
By Julia Purcell
From #3 issue

Astrid Andersen

Astrid Andersen

There are a lot of men in womenswear, but a significantly smaller number of women in menswear. What lead you to want to design for men ? How has the experience been for you as a woman ?
For me it’s very natural. I know how I want men to look, what attracts me and what does not. I use this as a very important tool in my work. I find it a relief to not have to take myself into any consideration other than what attracts me. I use this as a very important tool in my work. I find it a relief to not have to take myself into any consideration other than what attracts me.
Sportswear is the epitome of comfort and functionality, words that aren’t usually ascribed to high fashion. However, your clothes seem to be the middle ground between the two. How do you merge sportswear and lux cohesively ?
between the two. How do you merge sportswear and lux cohesively ?
Comfort for me is very necessary for a man to look good. The thought of a man wearing something that is uncomfortable is very unsexy in my opinion. I am part of a generation that has grown up with a different perception of clothes. We all wore tracksuits to school in the nineties and somehow this grew into a love of comfort and a determination to make this high fashion. I mean, I don’t understand why not.
You have been quoted as saying that the word “unisex” is outdated. How do you conceptualize gender ? What role does gender play for you when designing your clothes ?
I design for men, but I also wear menswear myself and I don’t give it two thoughts when I pick it out. So for me, the terms are really no longer relevant, it’s just clothes. I love it when I see a person, man or woman, who has completely transformed my clothes into his or her own by styling it in ways I never would.
In sportswear, logos are paramount : the Nike “Swoosh,” the Jordan’s “Jumpman,” etc. are iconic imagery. How did you design your logo ? What does it represent to you ?
I did my logo about 5 years ago with a good friend Kristian Møller. I always wanted a logo because I love how connected you can feel to other people through a logo. It’s a symbol of your choices and lifestyle without saying a word. That has always fascinated me. It’s part of our generation to relate to logos and connect internationally through them.
I always wanted a logo because I love how connected you can feel to other people through a logo. It’s a symbol of your choices and lifestyle without saying a word. That has always fascinated me. It’s part of our generation to relate to logos and connect internationally through them. [Astrid Andersen]
You were recently nominated for a British Fashion Award in “Emerging Menswear.” What does this nomination mean to you?
I am very honoured to be nominated for this award. The love that I feel for London is very strong and for it to nominate me as one of their own makes me very emotional because it’s truly here that my creative mind is at peace.
You collaborated with ASAP Ferg earlier this year for a fashion film “Water,” showcasing your spring/summer 2016 line. How did the collaboration come about? What is your perception on the connection between music and fashion? Most importantly, what are you listening to currently?
Ferg and I have done projects before and I love him and his energy. Creatively, we feed off each other. We have the same references and mindset, so it’s always just a conversation. In this case, [it] led to a film clip - which for me wasn’t meant to be a fashion film because it wasn’t a lookbook or some hard attempt to be cool. It was just a vision of creativity and an inspirational moment for both of us that we wanted to share. That’s the relationship that exists for me between music and fashion. Yes, you see the pictures of artists wearing fashion but if there’s no real connection involved, it’s just an endorsement and I think my generation is tired of all of that. At the moment, I’m listening to Krept & Konan’s Long Way Home album and I still listen to Rocky’s A.L.L.A. and Rodeo by Travis Scott and JME’s Integrity.
You’re Danish by birth, studied in London, draw obvious inspiration from Asia and have shot some look-books in L.A. What kind of inspiration do you take from each place? Do you see your clothes as belonging to a specific place or having a more universal context?
My generation is international and we praise different cultures, color and expressions. This is a true inspiration to me and if I didn't engage in this myself, it would feel wrong to me. I love to travel. To me, it is the ultimate luxury to experience other cultures.
You dropped a line with Topman in 2014 and only a few months later debuted your most ornate work yet with a bespoke collection at New York Fashion Week. Where do you see the future of your brand? Do you want to continue to toe the line between high fashion and ready-to-wear or do you foresee yourself focusing on one?
I truly hope to define our own definition. Everything I do, I do it because I’m 100% committed and I love what I do. We have a strategy, but nothing is calculated in the sense that we see what the market wants. My ambition is to create something that the market will have to understand, whether it be fur coats or collaborations.
By Julia Purcell
From #3 issue